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Ross-on-Wye

The Flood Alleviation Scheme Work 2008

2nd February 2008

Fiveways

Here the top of the bifurcation chamber is being completed by hand after the concrete had been poured to form "the lid" of the chamber.

The top of the bifurcation chamber (01-02-08)
The top of the bifurcation chamber
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

31st January 2008

tunnelling Machine

On the 31st January 2008 the 53 Tonne Tunnel Boring Machine was lowered into the rising shaft in the Homs Road Car Park. As the 400m tunnel is dug out, more sections will be added to the machine. As the tunnelling progresses at 10m to 12m per day, thus be hopefully completed by the end of May. The tunnel will follow the line of the brook, thus it will have three corners in it.

The earth and rock being removed will extracted using a belt inside the machine and hauled out to the bund area by lorry. It is hoped that the Flood Alleviation work will be completed by July 2008.


The tunnelling machine being prepared (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine being prepared
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)
The tunnelling machine over the shaft (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine over the shaft
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

Here we see the tunnelling machine or tunnelling equipment (TE) being prepared in the back of the lorry ready for the lift to get it into the rising shaft. Then there is a series of three photos showing the TE being lowered into the shaft.

The tunnelling machine being lowered (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine being lowered
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)
The tunnelling machine in the shaft (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine in the shaft
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

Below are a couple of shows showing the TE in the bottom of the shaft and then being manoeuvred into the prepared end of the tunnel ready to start boring.

The tunnelling machine being lowered (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine being lowered
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)
The tunnelling machine in the shaft (31-01-08)
The tunnelling machine in the shaft
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

30th January 2008

tunnelling Machine
The tunnelling machine (30-01-08)
The tunnelling machine
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)
The tunnelling machine on the lorry (30-01-08)
The tunnelling machine on the lorry
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

Today the front part of the tunnelling machine arrived on the back of a low-loader lorry. The scale can be seen when compared to the person stood next to it showing that it has around a 6' diameter.

Traditionally, like ships, tunnelling machines are given names and this one has been named Victoria.

This machine is designed to cut through the bed rock and should be able to cover 10-20 meters a day. The spoil is carried back by an Archemedes screw mechanism where it is then loaded into trucks that follow the machine.

The rear of the front stage of the tunnelling machine (30-01-08)
The rear of the front stage of the tunnelling machine
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

29th January 2008

Fiveways
Bifurcation chamber (29-01-08)
Bifurcation chamber
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)

Here the shuttering/former has been put in place so that the top of the chamber can be added so that the concrete can be poured on top of this. To the middle left can be seen the shuttering which will form the man access so that the chamber can be inspected.


Homs Road

In the bottom of the rising shaft the rails are being put in place that will initially carry the tunnelling machine into place and subsequently the engine and trucks to remove the spoil from the tunnelling operation.

Track being put in place (29-01-08)
Track being put in place
[Courtesy of Nuttall's]
(Click for a larger image)



next Flood alleviation Flood alleviation work 2007 previous


1 The brook referred to as the Chatterley Brook is actually a unnamed brook that flows from Weston-under-Penyard past Chackley Grove. It has only recently become referred to as the Chatterley Brook and locally it was previously known as Chackley Brook.

2 Flood Work Hit By Weak Teeth Ross-on-Wye Journal - Wednesday May 14, 2008


[Page updated: Feb 15 2011 13:31:59]






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