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Ross-on-Wye

Broad Street

Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye, runs north - south from Brookend Street up the hill to just below Market House where the Market Place starts.


Looking north down Broad Street from under the Market House towards the Brookend area of Ross.

Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Other than the changes to the shop fronts, there have not been a great number of changes to this street. The main change is probably the building of the Maltings shopping arcade just beyond the site of the Roxy cinema at the bottom / north end of the street.


Broad Street
Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
[No. 21204 published by Salmon - posted 1962]
(Click for a larger image)
Postcard view of Broad Street
Broad Street: Ross-on-Wye
[No. R334 published by Walter Scott]
(Click for a larger image)

A postcard of Broad Street
The view down Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
(Click for a larger image)

Here we have a postcard (unknown publisher - no. 10923) view of Broad Street from up towards the Market House, probably in the early 1900's.

On the right can be seen a nameless shop which may have been W. H. Smiths sometime around the point that it opened. Next down is "G. Eltome's" who was a shirt maker and tailor.


The postcard below left is thought to be circa 1935. A number of the shops are clearly visible. On the left side can be seen Mellias Ltd, The Crown and Sceptre Inn and W.H.Probert. In the middle of the view can be seen a police man can be seen walking down the middle of Broad Street and Blakes down at the junction between Station Street and Brookend Street. On the right can be seen J.C. Vine, W.H.Smith, Eltome & Son and the Star Supply Stores.

The postcard on the right is very clear is circa 1910. The shops are almost identical to those seen the lefthand postcard.

A postcard - Broad Street
Looking down Broad Street c.1930
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street in 1910
A Broad Street in 1910
(Click for a larger image)

Looking north from where Broad Street starts at the point where it meets the Market Place.

WH Smiths, on the right, has been there for over 100 years. The shop that is currently Mervyn James has been a menswear shop for over 100 years and around that time it was was called and run by G. Eltone.

On the left, the shop that is now "Going Places" travel agent was Mings chinese and chip shop in around 1995 before they moved to Brookend Street and around a 100 years ago the shop was W. Probert.

Shops on Broad Street
Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

The start of Broad Street
The start of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

The Market Place used to run from the junction with New Street up to St Mary's Street and along to the Gloucester Road junction although it now starts further up Broad Street and does not extend much further along the High Street than the Market House does now.


Here we see a postcard view looking north down Broad Street from around 1908. The shop on the right, called Nottingham House which is currently Peacocks, was Lewis's which was a clothes shop. There is a sign in the window which reads "SEASONS GOODS must be cleared at any cost" and outside the shop is a variety of chairs with all sorts of items on them for sale.

Next down in the Baptist Chapel as rebuilt by Thomas Blake with the ramp that was only removed in the last few years.

Then below that, the shop that is currently "Revolutions" bicycle shop (which was "Little & Hall") was "Vine's" who were a cash draper. Next down again was "Bussel's".

A postcard of the lower part of Broad Street
A postcard view of Broad Street
[Published by Frith's - no 64482]
(Click for a larger image)

Little & Hall sign
Sign for Little & Hall
(Click for a larger image)

Here is a sign that remains from when it was "Little and Hall Cycle Centre" dealing in Raleigh and Peugeot bikes for both sale and hire. They also had a workshop in the back of the shop where they were able to hold a wide variety of spares and repair and upgrade bicycles. They were established in 1921 until in the early 2000's when they became "Revolutions".


Looking north down Broad Street at the shops on the west side of the street.

The west side of Broad Street
The west side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

The east side of Broad Street
The east side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Looking north down the east side of Broad Street.


Looking north down the west side of Broad Street.

Another view of Broad Street
The west side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Perkins and Bellamy on Broad Street
The site of Perkins and Bellamy on Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

The site of Perkins and Bellamy on Broad Street between 1850 and 1900. In 1920 this shop was Oliver Lewis who sold linen, fabric and bedding. This shop was also the office for the Ross International Festival in 2004 (I think). It was then a Pound Shop selling all sorts of items for £1 and this was followed by Neat and Cheap selling house hold goods at low prices (until they moved to Gloucester Road). The shop was then redeveloped with the upper floors coverted into apartments and the shop became the womans clothes shop Country Collection.


Buildings on the east side of Broad Street with Crofts lane between the grey building and the red brick building on the far right.

The end of Crofts Lane
The west side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Nottingham House on Broad Street
Nottingham House on Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Nottingham House on Broad Street was also part of Perkins and Bellamy. It is currently "Peacocks" selling various clothing. The grey building to the right of it, is "Ross Books" which is a book shop selling various new books.


The Baptist Church on Broad Street.

The Baptist Church was originally built in 1819 and had fallen into disrepair by 1881 and Thomas Blake offered to rebuild it with a new one. The design looked pretty much as seen today. The rebuild took 8 months between the last service in the old building in April and the first in the new one in December, quite an amazing feat. In 1994, it had its frontage changed to remove a ramp and added the porch on the front to allow easier access which has been the only recent work externally on the building. The works were completed in 2000 when the interior was vastly improved.

Behind this building used to be a graveyard. This closed to new burials in 1884 but my father remembers climbing through the fence into the site as a child in the 1950's. This has since been converted into a car park at about the same time as the Crofts was redeveloped (from a public toilet and waste area where teenagers used to hang out getting drunk into the shopping area as seen today).

Baptist Church on Broad Street
Baptist Church on Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

C. Cox Butchers Shop

C Cox butchers shop
C Cox butchers shop
[Courtesy: Jill Hales]
(Click for a larger image)

This is a photo of Charles Ernest Cox (seen on the left) outside his Butchers Shop that was on Broad Street and it was known to have been there prior to and during 1895.

The lady seen on the right is Emily Cox who was Charles' daughter and the lady can just be seen in the shop was Mary Cox who was Charles' wife and Emily's mother. Charles had two daughters and a son. His other daughter was Annie Elizabeth Cox.


The butchers specialised in pork and pork products. The signs in the window say "The only genuine pork shop", "Note price 3s 6d", "Sausages fresh daily 7d" and "PORK. Pork. PORK.". In the shop window can be seen strings of sausages, hams and several other pork products and through the doorway can be seen a side of pork hanging from the roof.

This is a photo of the wedding of Annie Elizabeth Cox to Stephen Robert Williams on 5th August 1895 and was taken in the slaughter yard at the rear of the shop on Broad Street. They were married in the Parish Church (St. Mary's) in Ross by the curate R. Money Kyrle.

Annie is seen middle right holding the large bouquet with Stephen stood to her left. The lady stood to her right (also holding flowers) is her sister Emily. To the far left, sat down, can be seen Charles and Mary Cox, the boy knelt down in the middle bottom of the shot is Charles' son. The two people sat down on the far right are Stephen Williams' parents. His fathers name was George Williams and he was a Mason (as in a stone mason).

Wedding photo taken in the butchers yard
Wedding photo taken in the butchers yard
[Courtesy: Jill Hales]
(Click for a larger image)

Roxy Cinema

Below-left is a photo of the frontage of the Roxy Cinema and below-right is the frontage of the shop that is now on the site of the Roxy. [ The Roxy Story]

The Roxy Cinema Ross-on-Wye
The frontage of the Roxy Cinema
[Thanks to Mr. Tommey]
(Click for a larger image)
The site of the Roxy
The site of the Roxy Cinema on Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Looking south up Broad Street at the shops on the east and west side of the street from the point where Kyrle Street meets Broad Street.

Broad Streets shops (east side)
The east side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street shops (west side)
The west side of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

An old photo of Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
Old photo of Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Here we see a postcard (published by Friths - no 54483) view of Broad Street looking up from the north end towards the Market House.

More detail on this card can be found here.


At this end of the street, the shop in the centre here was Edmund Turner's Boot and Shoe factory was in the late 19th and early 20th century. With a staff of around twenty five people, they produced a huge range of hand stitched leather goods such as hunting, fishing and walking shoes and boots for ladies and gentlemen. They sold these in their two shops in Ross, the workshop was in the back of this building, and they had other shops in nearby towns. The production rate decreased as competition increased and sometime soon after the 1939-1945 war the now tiny factory finally closed.

The site of Edmund Turner
The site of Edmund Turner's Boot and Shoe factory
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street extends right down to the Station Street, Brookend Street and Broad Street junction on the east side and to the yellow building, as seen in the photo below, which is "The Electric Shop", on the west side.

Originally Brookend Street extended much further up the hill and may well have gone right up to the Market Place until the layout of the middle of Ross was changed and Broad Street was created or extended.

The end of Broad Street on the west side
The end of Broad Street on the west side
(Click for a larger image)
The end of Broad Street on the east side
The end of Broad Street on the east side
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street view
Broad Street
(Click for a larger image)

Here is the view back up Broad Street right up into the Market Place from the end of Station Street.


In this old postcard view, to the right can be seen Brown's Fish and Fruit Market.

A postcard view of the bottom of Broad Street
A postcard view of the bottom of Broad Street
[No. RS150 published by Friths]
(Click for a larger image)

Old Photos of Broad Street

These are various pictures of Broad Street in Ross-on-Wye.

The Kyrle Coffee House
The Kyrle Coffee House
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)

This is a photo postcard of the Kyrle Coffee House (posted 1909 from Whitchurch) and although it is not clear if it is actually in Ross there are several references to a company of the same name in old directries.

1891
Kyrle Coffee House Co. (Mrs Elizabeth Buckley, manageress) Broad Street
1895
Kyrle Coffee - E Buckley


A postcard view of Broad Street Ross-on-Wye probably in the early 1900's judging by the three ponies and traps on the street.

The view down Broad Street
The view down Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
[unknown publisher - no. 10923]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
Baptist Church on Broad Street
[published by Friths - no 54483]
(Click for a larger image)

Here we see a postcard view of Broad Street looking up from the north end towards the Market House. This view is likely to be in the early 1900's as the Baptist Chapel has been altered, which was done in 1881, and Bank House is being used by the India and China tea company thus presumably dating it after 1900 when Perkins and Bellamy closed but it must be before 1939 as as there is no sign of the Roxy cinema on the left. This would have covered the frontage where the "Fish & Fruit" shop was up to "Bristol House" (3rd shop up on the left).


This shop looks like it was a news agents. The 2nd shop on the left appears to be a house wares shop as it looks like there are baskets outside. Further up the street, outside of Bank House, there is a large Burtons Jam sign. During World War I part of the Perkins and Bellamy site was used as a jam factory, maybe this is an advert related to that.

To the right is The Eagle Inn and a Tea Room just up from that. This tea room may well have been owned by "D Smith" who was a baker, pastrycook and confectioner (and seller of Fry's Chocolate) who owned the shop in around 1905 (according to Lily-Elsie). This shop is currently Seven Seas Fish Bar.

By about 1950, the first shop on the left was likely to have been "Sadlers" which was run by Mrs. Wild and she lived in Kent Avenue. She had a lodger called Hugh Armstrong who was a teacher at the school and some of the students occasionally had to visit him there for additional lessons. Next up was "Langfords" which was a tobacconists and this shared it's entrance with "Alf Jennings" which was hair dressers. This later moved to Gloucester Road, to the middle shop where the Beijing Chinese restaurant is now (as it was three shops at that time).

Just below "Sadlers" was "Gwalia Cafe" which was owned or run by Mr. Preece; this may well have been the start of the Gwalia newsagents.

This postcard, from around 1905, is a view up Broad Street specifically of the right-hand side of the street. It is noticable that both the left and right side of the street have less buildings in use as shops; these buildings appear to be houses probably status symbols for the more wealthy shop owners within Ross.

Although this is a printed card (rather than a photograph) there are a couple of shops that can be made out, this includes H. Hawkes at 16 Broad Street and The India and China Tea Company at 50 Broad Street.

Broad Street Ross in 1905
Broad Street Ross
[Published: St & Co. D. - no 26483]
(Click for a larger image)

This postcard is incorrectly titled Ross-on-Wye. High Street but it actually shows the west side of Broad Street.

On the far left can be seen the Crown and Sceptre inn. Outside the Crown is R.G. Wade's van (reg DCJ323). R G Wade was a baker and confectioner and had a shop at 24 Broad Street (previously William J. Williams, subsequently Fears Grill and now JDs & Jaquelines Night Club). The back of the van states that Wedding Birthday Cakes a Speciality.

Ross-on-Wye High Street (actually Broad Street)
Ross-on-Wye. High Street (actually Broad Street)
[published by Judges - no 23376]
(Click for a larger image)

Next down (1 Broad Street) is T. Steward's shop who were High Class Meat Purveyors (butchers). Below that is Ross Laundry Depot, for the Ross and District Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd, Boots the Chemists.

On the opposite side is George Mason's and Eltome & Sons. The people in the shot seem to have little regard for the traffic as a number of them are walking down the middle of the road.

Sweeping Broad Street
Broad St. Ross
[published by R.E.Davies]
(Click for a larger image)

This is a view up Broad Street looking towards the Market House, from below the end of New Street.

The shot shows a number of men posing as if they are sweeping the street. There are also a number of boys stood around along with a number of dogs and a pony and trap.

To the far left is Benjamin's which was a cash chemists. On the right can be seen the Crown and Sceptre Inn and Broads Restaurant.


This view down Broad Street was taken in around 1918 and the only vehicles to be seen are a horse and cart and two ponies and traps.

There are a number of people out on the street who are watching the photographer.

Broad St. Ross 51
Broad St. Ross 51
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)

Looking up Broad Street

The postcard below is a view looking up Broad Street and was taken in around 1945. There are a very large number of cars, vans and people on Broad Street.

View up Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)

On the left and right of the photo can be seen a number of shops. On the left can be seen Harold Williams (41 Broad Street) which appears to have been a Tea Shop, next up the street is E.V.Powell (42 Broad Street) who were a family butchers, then its the Roxy Cinema and above that is Kings Cafe (45 Broad Street). In Bank House it can be seen that Dazeley Brothers their house furnishing and gift shop.


On the right can be seen New Inn (now the Eagle) which was selling Golden Hop which was an Alton Court Brewery product. Next up is E.Sollis (I think) at 22 Broad Street which sold fish and chips (and is now Seven Seas Fishbar) and further up was National Savings (at 20 Broad Street). Futher up is a ladies hairdresser and Boots the Chemist. At the top can be seen the Horse and Jockey.

The cars have registrations such as JHW 628 (HW = Bristol), AUX 240 (UX = Shropshire) and CMY 352 (MY = Middlesex). The range of car registrations seems to indicate that the vehicles may have travelled considerable distances to get to Ross.

Other views

Here are a number of other old photo-postcard views of Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye.

Ross-on-Wye from the Town Hall
Ross-on-Wye from the Town Hall
[No. R222 published by Walter Scott]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street from under Market House
A postcard view out from under the Market House and down Broad Street
[No. 211831 published by Valentine & Sons]
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street out from the Market House
A postcard view out from under the Market House and down Broad Street
[No. H.5284 published by Valentine & Sons]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street and Market Place
A postcard view down Broad Street
[No. 67704 published by Frith's - posted 1916]
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street as seen from the Market House window
Broad Street as seen from the Market House Window
[Unknown publisher - posted 1933]
(Click for a larger image)

The view down Broad Street
The view down Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
[No. S 7196 published by Kingsway]
(Click for a larger image)
Looking down Broad Street
The view down Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
[No. 76885 published by F. Frith & Co Ltd - posted 1932]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
[No. 21204 published by Salmon - posted 1962]
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street, Ross
Broad Street: Ross-on-Wye
[No. R334 published by Walter Scott]
(Click for a larger image)

Ross Broad Street
Ross Broad Street
[No. 6448 published by Frith's]
(Click for a larger image)
Broad Street Ross-on-Wye
Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
[No. RS150 published by Friths]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street. Ross-on-Wye
Broad Street. Ross on Wye.
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)
Ross, Broad Street
Ross, Broad Street
[No.76886 published by Friths]
(Click for a larger image)

Ross, Broad Street No. 67704
Ross, Broad Street
[No. 67704 published by Friths]
(Click for a larger image)
The Market in Broad Street
The Market in Broad Street, Ross on Wye.
[T.S.RS.93 published by Friths]
(Click for a larger image)

Broad Street c. 1907
Ross. Broad Street. circa 1907
[Unknown publisher]
(Click for a larger image)

This is a very clear shot of the top of Broad Street. Down the right side can be seen Edmund Turner & Co. shoe and boot maker, Eltome mens outfitter and Innell & Wharton Ironmongers. On the left side is the Crown and Sceptre selling Salt & Co. Ales and Stout. In the street are various men, women and children in the outfits of the time and several men in bowler hats. Also there are various horses and carts and ponys and traps parked in the street as their owners carry out their business.


Broad Street c. 1950
RS 113 Broad Street, Ross-on-Wye
[Published: F. Frith & Co Ltd, Reigate]
(Click for a larger image)

Shop Fronts

12 & 13 Broad Street

  • [2009]King Charles II
  • [2006]King Charles II
  • [1960]King Charles' Bar
  • [1952]King Charles' Bar
  • [1949]King Charles' Bar
  • [1938]Charles Edwards (Late T. W. Purchas & sons)
  • [1936]Charles Edwards (Late T. W. Purchas & sons)
  • [1933]Charles Edwards (Late T. W. Purchas & sons)
  • [1933]Chas. Edwards Ltd
  • [1935]Edwards Wine Merchants
  • [1923]Edwards - Charles Edwards (Worcester) Ltd
  • [1900]T. W. Purchas & Sons
  • [1890]T. W. Purchas & Sons
  • [1790]T. W. Purchas

T. W. Purchas & Sons
T W Purchas advert
T. W. Purchas & Sons advert2
Wine and Spirit Merchants
(Click for a larger image)

17 Broad Street (Raglan House)

  • [2009] Natures Choice
  • [2006] Natures Choice
  • [2006?] Nature's Choice Restaurant
  • [2000] Fresh Grounds
  • [1999] Fresh Grounds Restaurant
  • [1971] E. and A. Caterer

E. and A. Caterer
17 Broad Street
17 Broad Street circa 1963
(Click for a larger image)

E. and A. Caterer
E. and A. Caterer5
(Click for a larger image)

Natures Choice
17 Broad Street in 2008
17 Broad Street on 23/11/2008
(Click for a larger image)

Natures Choice
Natures Choice
(Click for a larger image)

Natures Choice is a café restaurant and a Guest House in an elegant Grade II listed Queen Anne building. It was taken over by Dean & Anna Clarke in around December 2008. [ natureschoicecafe.co.uk ].


22 Broad Street

  • [2009] Seven Seas Fishbar
  • [2006] Seven Seas Fishbar
  • [1999] Seven Seas Fishbar
  • [????] Ross Fish & Kebab Bar
  • [1950] E.Sollis?
  • [1905] DE Smith. Baker

David E. Smith
22 Broad Street
22 Broad Street circa 1910
(Click for a larger image)

David E. Smith
David E. Smith2
(Click for a larger image)

24 Broad Street

  • [2009] JDs & Jaquelines Night Club
  • [2007] JDs & Jaquelines Night Club
  • [2006] Jacqueline's
  • [1968] Fear's Restaurant & Bakery
  • [1965] Fear's Restaurant & Bakery
  • [1952] Fears Grill
  • [1933] William J. Williams
  • [1908] R.G.Wade

Jacqueline's
24 Broad Street in 2006 (5-4-2006)
24 Broad Street in 2006
(Click for a larger image)

Fears Restaurant & Bakery

In 1890 Mr. Francis John Fear opened up a bakery business at Viaduct Stores, Lower Lydbrook. After Francis's death, the bakery was carried on by his wife and later passed into the hands of her son, Reginald Francis Fear8.

In 1925 Harvey Fear was born at the store, born into the baking business, and by the age of eight he was delivering loaves to the houses local to the store. As he grew up, Harvey assisted by shovelling coke into the furnace and by mixing the dough.

In September 1941, aged 16, Harvey joined the Merchant Navy as a galley boy where he continued bread making in between peeling vegetables and a multitude of other jobs.

Later in his career, he became a ship's baker working in the Mediterranean and also moving Americans from Southampton to Le Havre after the D Day landings.

In 1946, he left the merchant navy and returned to the bakery in Lydbrook. Four years later, on 12th November 1950, Harvey took over the bakery in Broad Street Ross-on-Wye (which was where Jacqueline's cafe is now) from William J. Williams.

The site Fear`s Restaurant & Bakery
The site Fear`s Restaurant & Bakery
(Click for a larger image)

The site of the Top Spot and the bakery
The site of the Top Spot Ballroom
(Click for a larger image)

The bakery then became Fear's Restaurant & Bakery and this was before Sunday opening in Wales and they served coach loads of visitors who came to Ross for a Sunday outing. Because the front was the restaurant, the baking was carried out in a building at the rear of the premises. This building was demolished to make way for the Top Spot Ballroom in 1964.

Harvey sold the premises to Henry Danter and it then became Jacqueline's.


24 Broad Street
24 Broad Street circa 1972
(Click for a larger image)
Fears Restaurant & Bakery
Fears Restaurant & Bakery6
(Click for a larger image)

25 Broad Street

  • [2017] The Ross Bakery
  • [2016] Golden Crust Bakery closed
  • [2009] Golden Crust Bakery
  • [1984] Golden Crust Bakery (Richard Pearce)
  • [1973] Golden Crust Bakery (Harvey Fear)
  • [1960-1965] Ross-on-Wye Radio Ltd.
  • [1949] Ross-on-Wye Radio Ltd.
  • [1948] Browns Fish and Fruit Market

The Golden Crust Bakery
25 Broad Street in 2006 (5-4-2006)
25 Broad Street in 2006
(Click for a larger image)

In around 1973 Harvey Fear took over the premises next door and started The Golden Crust Bakery where he continued to hand make bread although the premises had solid brick gas-fired ovens8.

On the 12th November 1984, aged 59, he retired and sold the business to Mr. Richard Pearce, of Tewkesbury who, with his wife Lorraine, moved to Ross to run The Golden Crust Bakery; both of whom had previously work in other high quality bakeries and had worked in the bakery trade for 34 years7.

Prior to the move Richard was foreman baker in a large family bakery in Cheltenham and Lorraine had specialised in cake decoration in another bakery in Cheltenham. She joined Richard and this made The Golden Crust a complete Family Bakery.

They met each other whilst training at the North Gloucestershire College of Technology in Cheltenham; this was regarded as the best bakery school in Europe at that time.

Their family were also very involved in the bakery with Adrian, their eldest son who had been trained by his parents, bringing lots of creative ideas to the shop window. Their other son, Nicholas, also joined the team, working weekends as he still at John Kyrle High School.

On Friday 12th November 2004, exactly 20 years after taking over the shop, the bakery celebrated 20 years of supplying quality baking to Ross with a 25% discount day.

The Golden Crust Bakery
The Golden Crust Bakery
(Click for a larger image)

50A Broad Street

  • [2009] Phones 4U
  • [2007] Phones 4U
  • [2006] Under development
  • [2005] J Benjamin
  • [1905] J Benjamin

Benjamin Cash Chemists
50A Broad Street
50A Broad Street circa 1910
(Click for a larger image)
Benjamin Cash Chemists
Benjamin Cash Chemists2
(Click for a larger image)

The Lamb Inn
The Lamb Inn
The Lamb Inn c.19384
W. Davis - Accomodation and cuisine
(Click for a larger image)

55 Broad Street

  • [2017] Mervyn James - Closing down sale in November
  • [2009] Mervyn James
  • [2006] Mervyn James
  • [2003] Mervyn James
  • [1999] Mervyn James Ltd
  • [1975] Mervyn James Ltd
  • [1971] Mervyn James
  • [1965] Mervyn James
  • [1960] Eltome & Son
  • [1923] Eltome & Son
  • [1914] Eltome & Son
  • [1910] G. Eltome
  • [1905] George Eltome
  • [1900] G Eltome
  • [Est 1893] Eltome & Son

George Eltome
50B Broad Street
55 Broad Street circa 1910
(Click for a larger image)
George Eltome
George Eltome2
(Click for a larger image)

George Eltome
George Eltome advert3
Hatter, Hosier, Glover. Shirt & Collar maker.
(Click for a larger image)


1 Burrow's Wye Valley Illustrated Hereford to Chepstow - 4th Edition (circa 1950)
2 The Wye Valley Illustrated from Hereford to Chepstow
No.323 Burrows Royal Handbooks [Fifth Edition c.1910]
published by Edward J. Burrow (1)
3 Ross The official Guide of the Ross Urban District Council
No.287 The "Borough" Guides [c.1903-1914]
printed by Lawrence & Fowler, Market Place, Ross (2)
4 Ross - The Gateway of the Wye Valley - Ross-on-Wye Chamber of Commerce [c.1938] (3)
5 Ross - The Gateway of the Wye Valley - Ross-on-Wye Chamber of Commerce [c.1963]
6 Ross - The Gateway of the Wye Valley - Ross-on-Wye Chamber of Commerce [c.1972]
7 Ross Gazette - 11th November 2004
8 Ross Gazette - 15th November 1984

Old Receipts & Bills

Innell & Wharton

Innell & Wharton were ironmongers based in Broad Street.

The receipt is for various plumbing items like pipe and outlets.

This receipt dates from 2nd December 1897.

Innell & Wharton receipt
Innell & Wharton receipt
(Click for a larger image)

Andrew Baldwin

Andrew Baldwin was a painter, paperhanger (wall paper hanger), glazier and gilder based in Broad Street.

The receipt was for the supply of several pieces of wall paper along with the flour used to produce the hanging paste.

This receipt dates from 22nd Jan 1898 and was settled 2nd Feb 1898.

Andrew Baldwin receipt
Andrew Baldwin receipt
(Click for a larger image)

Edmund Turner & Co. Ltd

Edmund Turner & Co. Ltd were shoe specialists in Ross carrying out repairs by modern methods. MASCOT was their brand of shoes and these were shoes for every member of the family are obainable in handsomely designed shapes for the needs, tastes, and feet, and your inspection of our stock is always cordially welcomed.

They had branches at 43 High Street and 36 Broad Street in Ross and also in Hereford, Monmouth and Abergavenny.

This item dates from 1928.

Edmund Turner & Co. Ltd
Edmund Turner & Co. Ltd
(Click for a larger image)


Woolworths in Ross

Woolworths

Number 9 Broad Street was originally a shop that belonged to Mr. J. Price. Mr Price was a picture framer, glazier and decorator and he lived, with his family, in the house next door to the shop1.

Woolworths opened its first store in Liverpool in 1909 and its system of individual counters for various goods proved popular and the store was well-established by the end of the First World War. The format proved a complete hit with shoppers, and it quickly became known as 'Woolies', a nickname that stuck. Woolies started out as a threepence and sixpence (3d and 6d) store and all their sales products fitted into one of these price bands. Due to the store being an immediate hit, the company started to expand and the stores then started to spring up across the country.

Mr Price's shop was demolished when F.W. Woolworth & Co. Ltd. purchased the site in order to build their store, which was store no 570, in the early 1930s and the store opened in May 1931. The manager of Woolworth in May 1938 was Mr J P McCoy.

As a result Mr Price then moved his business to 46 Broad Street (where Oxfam is now) where it remained until the mid-1960s when Sutherland Printers took over the premises.

Many of the early Woolworths stores replaced the existing shops and this means that the frontage of a store is quite distinctive and easy to recognise as the upper parts of the frontages often have a similar style. In the time since then the stores have moved into shopping centres or utilised pre-built retail outlets so later stores do not share this feature.

The standard upper frontage of the Woolworths stores
The standard upper frontage of the Woolworths stores
(Click for a larger image)

One lady I spoke to stated that she remembered when the Woolies store opened and she always loved going into the shop in the 1940s as a child with 6d as she could afford any item within the shop. She also stated that it was like going into a museum as there were so many different glass counters and cases holding the formidable number of items for sale.

By the 1960s, Woolworths was a formidable high street presence and it was at its popularity peak but since te 1980s sales dropped off due to increasing levels of competition. Woolies went through several rebrandings and many became "Woolworths Local's" such as the one in Ross.

Woolworths Local on Broad Street (05-04-06)
Ross' Woolworths Local in 2006
(Click for a larger image)

Many remained as the "Local" shops but for the Ross store, on 8th October 2007, planning permission was given to change the frontage to the current Woolworths style and the work was carried out soon after.

Woolworths replacement frontage
Woolworths replacement frontage
(Click for a larger image)
Woolworths frontage at night
Woolworths frontage at night
(Click for a larger image)

Interestingly, the large doors (or very similar ones) immediately up the street from the store can be seen in photos dating back prior to Woolworths being built.

On the 23rd December 2008 the 7 day countdown started towards the closure of the store with the discounts increasing daily until on the final day started with 70% discounts rising to 90% by the time to the store closed. The Ross-on-Wye store closed its doors to the public for the last time on the 30th December 2008.

Woolies now closed in Ross (30-12-08)
Woolies now closed in Ross
(Click for a larger image)

1st January 2009

Inside the shop it can be seen that the clearance of the fixtures and fittings is well underway. The shelving has been dismantled and put on pallets and awaiting removal from the shop.

The inside of Woolworths (01-01-2009)
The inside of Woolworths
(Click for a larger image)
Inside Woolworths (01-01-2009)
Inside Woolworths
(Click for a larger image)

Inside the shop, now that the shelving on the walls has been removed, the brickwork and wooden battening down the left side can be clearly seen.

On the right-hand side, the till area is still intact (with the tills still active) and this appears to be one of the last areas to be cleared.

Woolworths internal wall (01-01-2009)
Woolworths internal wall
(Click for a larger image)
Woolworths till area (01-01-2009)
Woolworths till area
(Click for a larger image)

2nd January 2009
The inside of Woolworths after having been cleared (02-01-2009)
The inside of Woolworths after having been cleared
(Click for a larger image)

The inside of Woolworths has now been cleared out. All the shelving and racking has now been removed.

The only remaining items in the store are a few cages and some stands as used to hold items like keyrings etc for sale.




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[Page updated: Nov 19 2017 19:02:57]






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